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Melamine Found In Chinese Tainted Milk Products Again

Posted by on Jul 09, 2010 | Leave a Comment

After one year Melamine-tainted dairy products have resurfaced again in China, as thousands of children have been hospitalized in massive milk safety outbreak. Recently, high levels of the industrial chemical were found from the products of four Chinese food companies such as Shandong Zibo Lusaier Dairy, Liaoning Tieling Wuzhou Food and Laoting Kaida Refrigeration.

Test samples showed the milk powder carried up to 500 times the maximum allowed level of the chemical. In 2008, six babies killed and more than 300000 baby ill with the use of melamine in milk. China ordered tens of thousands of milk products laced with an industrial chemical burned or buried.

On last week, The Health Ministry said “At least five companies are suspected of reselling tainted products that should have been destroyed”. Ling Hu, a Guizhou provincial government spokeswoman said “Frozen milk products and cartons of milk dating from early 2009 were taken off the shelves after health inspectors tested them and found melamine.

The Scandal caused outrage in the middle of consumers and fraught parents and led to an international outcry about the standards of food safety in China. More than 20 people were convicted for their roles in the scandal, and two people were carried out.

Serious concern about Melamine

Melamine is used for making plastics, fertilizers and concrete. When it added in food product, it points out a higher apparent protein content but can cause kidney stones and kidney failure. Small amounts of melamine are not measured a health risk, yet in high attentions, it becomes toxic.

The maximum level of melamine allowed in baby formula is set at 1 milligram per kilogram. In other food and in animal feed, the maximum level is set at 2.5 milligrams of melamine per kilogram. The Codex Alimentarius Commission is set all melamine standards to protect the health of consumers and to guarantee fair practices in international food trade.



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