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Bottled water have high level of bacteria

Posted by on May 29, 2010 | Leave a Comment

Research team at Ccrest Laboratories in Canada, found that more than 70% of the popular drinking water brand have high levels of bacteria. Microbiologist Dr Sonish Azam said “Heterotrophic bacteria counts in some of the bottles were found to be in revolting figures of one hundred times more than the permitted limit.”

Is is not possible to make it completely free from microorganisms, but the level found in it is higher than tap water. Customers thinks that bottle water is higher in price, so it is pure and safe to drink. Nutritionist Dr Chris Fenn said there was no need to drink bottled water in the UK because tap water was so good. Bottle water should follow the standards set out by the United States Pharmacopeia, a non-governmental agency that sets safety standards for medications and health-care products. No more than 500 colony forming units (cfu) of bacteria per milliliter should be present in drinking water, according to the USP. but Some brands had as much as 70,000 cfu per milliliter. which is 100 times of the limit.

Bottle water also costs in terms of environment and resource usage. Higher level of these bactaria generally don’t create serious health problem in healthy people. but more care should be taken with pregnant woman and children.

Only 27% of respondents drink bottled mineral water in an average day, with 58% typically consuming tap water. Interestingly, those better off are most likely to drink tap water, with 62% of the more affluent drinking tap water, as opposed to the 53% of their typically less well off counterparts.

James McCoy, research director for YouGov SixthSense, said: “The mineral water market has experienced exponential growth over the past ten years but signs are this may be coming to an end. New reports are significant in altering the interrelated perceptions of tap water and bottled water, but the recession, innovations in home filtering and the popularity of Britta-style products may also have contributed to the renewed faith in tap-water.”


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